French Settlers in New France


Guillaume HUBOU

Guillaume arrived in Québec in 1623 as an exmployee of the Compagnie de Caen where he stayed for a year. On 16 May 1629, he married Marie Rollet, the widow of Louis Hébert. He was given land on 2 Dec 1635 by Champlain around Québec. Guillaume and Marie rendered great service to the missionairies by taking care of abandoned young native children and raising them in a Christian manner. Marie died in 1649. He died four years later on 12 May 1653.(1)

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D174 Guillaume Hubou


 

Hélène BOULLÉ

Hélène Boullé was born in 1598. She was the daughter of Nicolas BOULLÉ & Marguerite ALIX. On 29 Dec 1610, she married Samuel de Champlain at Saint-Germain-L'Auxerrois. Since she was only twelve years old, marriageable age at that time, her parents demanded a lapse of two years before cohabitation. Her family and her education were Calvinist. However, the ALIX family was Catholic, since the marriage took place in a Catholic church, and Hélène's brother became a religious in the order of Minims. Hélène accompanied her husband to New France in 1620. She lived there until 1624. She was Hélène Desportes' godmother in 1620. Her conduct during the reading of Champlain's will showed her attachment, respect and fidelity to her husband. After settling her affairs, she joined the Ursulines of Sainte-Ursule in Paris. She made her profession in the convent of Meaux, which she had founded on 17 Mar 1648. She died on 20 Dec 1654 at the age of 56. (3)

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Samuel de CHAMPLAIN (1570-1635)

Samuel de Champlain was born at Brouage in 1570. He was initiated into sailing from childhood. He received his license in 1598 and made a voyage to Spain and to Spanish America. In 1603, he accompanied François DuPont-Gravé to Tadoussac and sailed up the river as fas as the Saint-Louis Falls (near Montréal). He observed and made maps of the area. In 1604, he accompanied De Monts to Acadia as an geographer and explorer. From that time up to 1606, he explored the Atlantic Coast from Cape Breton Island as far south as Massachusetts, drawing maps. He received a commission for a post at Québec with the title of lieutenant in 1608. In 1609, he joined the Hurons and the Algonquins in a war against the Iroquois on the lake that still bears his name.

On 30 Dec 1610, he married Hélène BOULLÉ, aged 12, in Paris. In May 1611, he met Biencourt and Biard on the ice near Newfoundland. He planned an establishment at Montréal, restored the post at Québec and returned to France. Having formed a new trading company, he returned to Québec in 1613 and pushed his explorations as far as Allumette Island (near Pembroke, Ontario) on the Ottawa. He returned to France in 1614. In 1615, he brought along four Recollet priests and went up as far as Lake Huron to help the Hurons in war. He did not return to Québec until 1616 to go back to France. In 1617, he brought Louis HÉBERT and his family to Québec. There was another voyage in 1618. He spent the following year in France. In 1620, he brought his wife to Québec where he lived until 1624, when he returned with her to France. The Jesuits arrived during his absence. He returned only in 1626 and held onto the little post of Québec. He was repatriated to France after his surrender to Kirke. As the lieutenant for the Hundred Associates, he returned to Québec in 1633, restored it, built a church and sent people to establish Trois-Rivières in 1634. After being stricken with paralysis in Oct 1635, he died on Christmas. (4) (4)

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Jeanne LEMARCHAND

Jeanne LEMARCHAND was the widow of Mathiew LENEUF de Caen and the mother of Jacques and Michel, when she accompanied these boys to New France in 1636. She lived at Trois-Rivières with her son Michel. She appears several times as a godmother for some native people. The last mention of her was in 1647. (5)

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Jeanne Le Marchand


 

Marie LENEUF (bef. 1616 - d. 1688

Marie LENEUF arrived in the country with her mother and brothers in 1636. On 15 Dec 1636, she married Jean GODEFROY, the interpreter at Trois-Rivières. She was a midwife in the young colony. She raised eleven children, nine of whom survived. She died at Trois-Rivières on 27 Oct 1688. (6)

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Marie Jeanne Leneuf


 

Jacques MAHEU (d. 1663)

Jacques MAHEU was originally from Perche, France. He appeared in New France in 1637. On 26 Sep 1639, at Québec, he married Anne CONVENT, the widow of Philippe AMIOT and mother of Jean AMIOT, the young lad who was raised among the Hurons by the Jesuits and then became an interpreter. The family lived on the outskirts of Québec close to the city. He was a churchwarden in 1656, 1657 and 1659. He was confirmed at Québec on 10 Aug 1659. When he fell ill, he made his Will on 6 Mar 1663 and was buried at Québec on 22 July 1663.

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Jacques Maheu


 

Marie ROLLET (d. 1647)

Marie ROLLET was Louis HÉBERT's wife in 1602 and lived in the faubourg of Saint-Germain des Prés at Paris. Her husband took part in the Acadia enterprise in the service of Sieur de Monts or Jean de Poutrincourt. Louis left her alone in Paris for several years in 1606-1607 and in 1611-1613. In 1617, Louis HÉBERT at the invitation of Champlain and De Monts agreed to sell all his goods in Paris and settle in Québec. Marie followed him with their three children: Anne, Guillemette and Guillaume, and his nephew Claude Rollet as a hired hand. Anne married Étienne JONQUEST at Québec in 1618; she died during her first birth-giving in 1619 and her husband followed her in death shortly thereafter. In 1626, Marie's husband Louis Hébert finally obtained a title of ownership from Ventadour for his fields at Québec, along with one league of land on the Saint-Charles River. Louis died in Jan 1627. Marie continued his work with the help of Guillaume COUILLARD, husband of her daughter Guillemette, who married Guillaume on 26 Aug 1621. She took part in the baptism of Naneogauachit, an Algonquin, staging a banquet for the natives in 1627. She was a godmother to many natives. On 16 May 1629, she married Guillaume HUBOU. Upon Champlains's advice, she decided to remain in Québec, along with her husband, son-in-law, and her son Guillaume during the occupation of Québec by the Kirkes. She welcomed the return of the Jesuits in 1632 who celebrated Mass in her home. She had her land and her cattle. Her house became the shelter for young native girls who were being educated by the Jesuits. She was a respected matron who lived with her husband up to her death on 27 May 1647, in poverty but with dignity. (8)

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Marie Rollet

 

(1) Biographical Dictionary for The Jesuit Missions in Acadia and New France: 1602-1654, Lucien Campeau, S.J., translated by William Lonc, S.J. & George Topp, S.J., summer 2001, p. 278.
(2) Ibid., p. 279.
(3) Ibid., p. 76.
(4) Ibid., p. 105-106.
(5) Ibid., p. 249.
(6) Ibid., p. 263.
(7) Ibid., p. 272.
(8) Ibid., p. 377-378.