The Amerindians


Étienne MANGOUCH

Étienne MANGOUCH was also known as Étienne MAG8CH & MAY8CH. He was a Nipissirinian and was one of the first Amerindians to be baptized. When he was baptized in 1644, he "began to pray in public to God, renounced the superstitious practices of the country and ridiculed all thosw who were opposed to his plan". He was one of the strongest supporters of the missionairies among his own people. He was captured by the Mohawks on 3 May 1652 but escaped and was picked up on the St. Lawrence River by Father Ragueneau on his way down to Montréal. He arrived at Québec on 31 Jul 1653 bringing some news from the lands in the west. Étienne joined Charles Pachirini's tribe at Trois-Rivières. Father Ragueneau served as the officating priest at his wedding in Trois-Rivières on 16 Apr 1657.

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D296 Étienne Mangouch


 

Manit8eabe8ichit

Roch Manitoueabeouichit was baptized on 14 Nov 1636. His wife was Outchibahanoukoueou. There is no record of their marriage. François Derré de Gand was his godfather, from whom he received French clothing.

He put his daughter into the care of Olivier Letardif, who entrusted her to Guillaume Hubou, the second husband of Marie Rollet, Louis Hébert's widow. She was brought up as French by Guillaume. She was given the christian name of Marie Sylvestre Olivier at her baptism. She married Martin Prévost on 3 Nov 1644 at Québec. Martin & Marie had eight children. Marie is known legally by her father's name, Manit8eabe8ich. (2)

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Martin Provost & Marie Olivier Manitouabeouich


 

8chista8ichi8e - OUCHISTAUICHKOUE

Ouchistauichkoue was also known as Marie Olivier Manitouabeouich was the daughter of Roch Manitouabeuich. She was adopted by Olivier Letardif and instructed by Guillaume Hubou and the Ursulines. She married Martin Prévost at Québec on 3 Nov 1644. They had eight children; three of her sons left descendants. She died at Québec on 10 Sep 1665. (3)

http://www.genealogie.org/famille/prevost-provost/page1.html

MANITOUABEOUICH, Marie (alias Marie-Olivier Sylvestre) (fille de Roch et de Outchibahabanoukoueou), décédée le 10 septembre 1665 à Québec.

En 1644, Marie Manitouabe8ich une jeune amérindienne convertie au catholicisme, épouse Martin Prévost, un Français de 33 ans récemment débarqué à Québec. Ce fut le premier mariage béni officiellement par l'Église catholique en Nouvelle-France entre un Européen et une Amérindienne. Leurs enfants et leurs petits-enfants épouseront des Billot, Binet, Blondeau, Courville dit Cadieux, David dit Pontife, Dupras, Gagnon, Gallien, Garnier, Giroux, Guillot, Marier, Morin, Petitclerc, Salois, Sedillot, Tardif, Vachon et bien d'autres encore.

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Simon PIECHKARETCH

Simon PIECHKARETCH was a war-chief of the Allumette Island Algonquins and was known as a brave Algonquin warrior. After following catechetical instructions from Father BUTEUX at Trois-Rivières and having his children baptized, he himself received baptism on 30 Jan 1641, despite the opposition of TESSOUEHAT and OUMASATIKOUEIE. In Feb 1642, he asked LEJEUNE's blessing at Richelieu as he was about to leave on an expedition against the Mohawks, which ended up as a failure and returned to Montréal in March. His lack of success determined the Algonquins to withdraw from Montréal to Trois-Rivières that year. He gave Montmagny the Mohawk prisoners who were to arrange for a peace in 1645. He was not very fervent in his practice of Christianity, but did not lose his faith. He was put in charge of Algonquin policy at Trois-Rivières. He had a second conversion in 1646 and became more prayerful. When his compatriots were hunting in the area of Richelieu during the truce, the war-chief ran into a band of six Mohawks when he was all alone. He welcomed them as friends but one of the Iroquois pierced his lumbar region with a single thrust of a sword; he died in the first months of 1647. (4)

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TESSOUAT I

Tessouat I was also known as Tesouehat, Tessouehat and Tesouesatch. He was the Algonquin captain of Allumette Island. Champlain meet this person for the first time at Tadoussac, celebrating a victory over the Iroquois with the Montagnais and Etchemin allies. Champlain visited him in 1613 on the island and the captain staged a solemn feast "tabagie" in Champlain's honor. He prevented Champlain from going to James Bay by forcing Champlain's interpreter Vignau to say that he had misled his employer (Champlain) by claiming that he had been there. Tessouat, on this occasion, was called a "good old" captain. He wanted to prevent the Hurons from going below Allumette Island and simultaneously watned to prevent the French from going above it, all this so that he would be the intermediary between the Hurons and the French. He died on his island in the spring of 1636. (5)

 

TESSOUHAT II, Paul

Paul Tessouhat II was the chief of the Kichesipirini, or Algonquins of Allumette Island, having succeeded his father of the same name in 1636. Arrogant and cunning, he detested the French, whom he had to treat with respect, however, because he and his band had no one else to help them during the famine. He appeared at Québec in 1637, but it was mainly after 1640 that he began to visit Trois-Rivières, where he did everything he could to prevent the conversion of his people. After causing much embarrassment to Fr. Buteux and thwarted by Le Jeune who had been summoned from Québec to oppose him and his crony Oumasatikoueie the Apostate, he headed off with his band to Fort Richelieu at the end of 1642. The two vagabonds moved to Montréal. They created a farce, in that they had themselves baptized by Frs. Dupéron and Poncet, and Maisonneuve gave them each a musket, the underlying objective of their maneuvers. The two left Montréal after the Mohawks inflicted a defeat on them. Tessouehat's faked conversion did not change his character and disposition. The Jesuits refused Communion to him and his wife. whereas the rest of the Algonquins became Christians one after another. Tessouehat became more and more discredited among his own people and was relegated to several years of obscurity. He was succeeded by Charles Pachirini as sachem of the Algonquins at Trois-Rivières. He reappeared in 1654, stripped of his pride and office:"Finally this little man, completely puffed up with pride, died in Christian humility giving -- towards the end of his life -- some signs of salvation". After two years of sickness, he died at Trois-Rivières on 8 March 1654 and was buried there. (6)

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(1) Biographical Dictionary for The Jesuit Missions in Acadia and New France: 1602-1654, Lucien Campeau, S.J., translated by William Lonc, S.J. & George Topp, S.J., summer 2001, p. 278.
(2) Ibid., p. 279.
(3) Ibid., p. 327.
(4) Ibid., p. 343.
(5) Ibid., p. 403-404.
(6) Ibid., p. 404-405.